Zajęcia w języku angielskim

dla studentów programu Erasmus; studenci IHS mogą w nich uczestniczyć traktując je jako zajęcia problemowo-specjalizacyjne

Queer Art & Politics: Central and Eastern European Perspectives
prof. UAM dr hab. Paweł Leszkowicz
I semestr, 30 godz.
6 pkt. ECTS
Forma zaliczenia: zaliczenie z notą Language: English The aim of this course is to explore contemporary queer art, ideas, visual culture and politics in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). We will examine queer art and LGBTQ history and activism through the work of individual artists and organizations, selected art projects, visibility campaigns and themed exhibitions. The differing and volatile status of queer rights in many CEE countries demands that we take a comparative approach, especially analysing the challenging situations in Poland and Russia. The legal antidiscriminatory provisions of the EU will also be covered to create a background for the LGBTQ debates, struggles, conflicts and creative expressions. The course focuses on the period after 1989, following the difficult transition to democracy in Central and Eastern Europe. However we will also consider some historical aspects of sexual and artistic regulations under Communism. Moreover CEE queer culture would be put in an international context of art, politics and history concerning LGBTQ identities. While examining the histories, politics and aesthetics of queer rights, theory and art, we will debate the functions of art and visual culture as a platform for LGBTQ identities, as well as an agency for democracy in the region. The course combines the contemporary Eastern European history of sexuality and art, concentrating on questions of freedom of expression, human rights, the representation of desire and love, censorship and repression, and the intersection of culture and the politics of emancipation. It has an interdisciplinary character, drawing on research in art history, cultural studies, European studies, history, political philosophy, sociology and law, and is designed for students from all these disciplines. Requirements Seminar attendance and the reading of assigned texts are compulsory. Seminars will be organized around discussion about reading from the syllabus and around individual students’ presentations of selected topics. On a rotating basis, each student will give a couple of brief presentations that should include visual material and the obligatory readings. The classes are intended to foster lively discussion, dialogic exchange and mutual learning. Toward the end of the semester each student will deliver a  longer talk on their research for the final paper. Erasmus students who want to get credits for a seminar will need to write an essay, and the Polish students who want to get credits for a facultative course will have to prepare in class presentations. Therefore the ability to critically understand and summarize academic and journalistic texts is necessary, as well as the skills of in class presentations and academic writing.

Bibliography
• Cooper, Emmanuel, The Sexual Perspective. Homosexuality and Art in the Last 100 Years in the
West (London, New York: Routledge, 1994)
• Dziewanska Marta, Degot Ekaterina, Budraitskis Ilya (ed.), Post-Post-Soviet? Art, Politics & Society
in Russia at the Turn of the Decade (Warsaw Museum of Modern Art, 2013)
• Essing Laurie, Queer in Russia: A Story of Sex, Self, and the Other, (Duke University Press Books
1999)
• Fejes Narcisz, Balogh Andrea (eds), Queer Visibility in Post-socialist Cultures, (Bristol, Chicago,
Intellect, 2013)
• Horne, Peter and Lewis Reina (ed.), Outlooks. Lesbian and Gay Sexualities and Visual Cultures
(London, New York: Routledge,1996)
• Karlinsky Simon, “Russia’s Gay Literature and Culture: The Impact of the October Revolution”, in:
Hidden From History: Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past (New York: Penguin, 1990).
• Kitliński, Tomasz, Dream? Democracy! A Philosophy of Horror, Hope & Hospitality in Art & Action,
(Lublin: Maria Curie-Skłodowska University Press 2014)
• Kulpa, Robert and Joanna Mizielinska (ed.), De-Centring Western Sexualities Central and Eastern
European Perspectives (London: Ashgate, 2011)
• Kuhar, Roman and Takacs, Judit (ed.), Beyond the Pink Curtain. Everyday Life of LGBT People in
Eastern Europe (Ljubljana: Peace Institute, 2007)
• Leszkowicz, Pawel, Ars Homo Erotica, exhibition catalogue Warsaw’s National Museum (Warsaw:
National Museum 2010)
• Leszkowicz, Pawel, Art Pride. Gay Art from Poland (Warsaw: Abiekt.pl, 2010)
• Leszkowicz, Pawel, Love is Love. Art as LGBTQ Activism –from Britain to Belarus ( Lublin: Labirynt
Gallery, 2011)
• Nussbaum, Martha C., Sex and Social Justice, (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000)
• Pejic, Bojana (ed.) , Gender Check: A Reader. Art and Theory in Eastern Europe (Cologne: Verlag
der Buchhandlung Walther Konig, 2011)
• Pejic, Bojana (ed.), Gender Check. Feminity and Masculinity in the Art of Eastern Europe:
A Catalogue, exhibition catalogue MUMOK Vienna (Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther
Konig, 2009)
• Reed, Christopher, Art and Homosexuality. A History of Ideas ( Oxford: Oxford University Press,
2011), pp. 1-9.
• Summers, Claude J. (ed.), The Queer Encyclopedia of the Visual Arts (Berkeley: Cleis Press, 2004)
• Tin, Louis-Georges (ed.) The Dictionary of Homophobia: A Global History of Gay & Lesbian
Experience (Vancouver:Arsenal Pulp Press, 2008)
• Tuller David, Cracks in the Iron Closet: Travels in Gay and Lesbian Russia, (Chicago, University of
Chicago Press, 1996)
Websites
• http://www.artmargins.com/
• http://www.glbtq.com/
• http://www.ilga-europe.org/

Art, Visual Culture and Civil Rights in the USA
dr Filip Lipiński
I semester, 30 godz.
6 pkt. ECTS
Forma zaliczenia: zaliczenie z notą
The course will focus on the analysis of responses in art and visual culture to the events in the 1960s and 1970s in the era of Civil Rights movements in the USA. Students will get familiar with main historical, political and cultural issues in the period under discussion and in this context we will discuss a variety of visual phenomena (artworks, posters, films) which were a platform of protest, emancipation and struggle for the rights of different social groups: African-Americans, Native-Americans, women, gays etc. We will also look at contemporary examples of artworks that continue the issues started in 1960s and 1970s. The overall aim of the course is to increase students’ awareness of visual language in the given period and the political dimension of art and visual culture in general. Requirements: Good knowledge of English – ability to read academic texts and actively participate in discussions. General knowledge of history of the US and issues related to art and visual culture are welcome but not indispensible.

Literarture:
• The reading list presents general sources. Specific texts assigned for individual classes will be
given during the the course.
• M. Berger, For All the World to See. Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights, New Haven
2010.
• C. Butler, L. G. Mark (eds.), WACK! Art and the Feminist Revolution, New York 2007.
• K. Fitz (ed)., Visual Representations of Native Americans, Heidelberg 2012.
• M. Godfrey, Z. Whitley (eds.), Soul of a Nation. Art in the Age of Black Power, London 2017.
• P. Hills (ed.), Modern Art in the USA. Issues and Controversies of the 20th Century, Upper Saddle
River 2001.
• M. Ho et all (ed.), Artists Respond. American Art and Vietnam War 1965-1975, Princeton 2019.
• A. Jones (ed.), A Companion to Contemporary Art Since 1945, Oxford 2006.
• L. Lippard, Mixed Blessings. New Art in Multicultural America, New York 1990.
• D. Lubin, Shooting Kennedy. JFK and the Culture of Images, Berkeley 2003.
• B. Siegler, Signs of Resistance. A Visual History of Protest in America, New York 2018.

Old and New Narratives – Art and Communism in East-Central Europe
dr Magdalena Radomska
I semestr, 30 godz.
6 pkt. ECTS
Forma zaliczenia: zaliczenie z notą The course will be focused on reevaluation of crucial art-historical narratives in EastCentral Europe from 1945 until 1989. The aim of the course is to outline new narratives and illustrate new approaches towards art created during communism, such as – art Old and New Narratives – Art and Communism in East-Central Europe dr Magdalena Radomska I semestr, 30 godz. 6 pkt. ECTS Forma zaliczenia: zaliczenie z notą The course will be focused on reevaluation of crucial art-historical narratives in EastCentral Europe from 1945 until 1989. The aim of the course is to outline new narratives and illustrate new approaches towards art created during communism, such as – art. 

READING LIST
• Bartošová, Z. (ed.), Contemporary Slovak Fine Art. 1960-2000. From the First Slovak Investnemt
Group’s Collection, Bratislava 2000.
• Bazin, J., Glatigny P., Piotrowski, P., Art beyond Borders: Artistic Exchange in Communist Europe
(1945-1989), Budapest 2016.
• Bosteels, B. The Actuality of Communism, London-New York 2011.
• Bryzgel, A., Performance Art in Eastern Europe Since 1960, Chicago 2017.
• Fowkes, M., The Green Bloc: Neo-avant-garde Art and Ecology under Socialism, Budapest 2015.
• Groys, B., Art Power, Cambridge, MA 2008.
• Gržinić, M., Retroavangarde, Wien, 1997.
• Kemp-Welsh, K, Networking the Bloc. Experimental Art in Eastern Europe 1965–1981, Manchester
2019.
• Pejić, B. (ed.), Gender Check. Femininity and Masculinity in the Art of Eastern Europe, Wien/
Cologne 2011.
• Piotrowski Piotr, In the Shadow of Yalta Art and the Avant-garde in Eastern Europe 1945-1989,
London 2009.
• Šuvaković, M., Impossible Histories: Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes and Post-Avant
Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991, Cambridge 2003.

Women, Art and Society in the Eastern Bloc 
prof. UAM dr hab. Agata Jakubowska
II semester, 30 godz.
6 pkt. ECTS
Forma zaliczenia: zaliczenie z notą The aim of this course is to explore representations of women and art created by women in Eastern Europe. The course will cover the period between 1945 and 1989. Individual artists, events, and phenomena will be considered in a wider sociopolitical context. We will analyze relationships between the visual arts and various discourses related to women that circulated in the socialist states, including debates about education, sexuality, architecture, health, state security, etc.. Art, including art education, exhibitions, and criticism, will be considered not as merely reflecting external values and assumptions, but as actively participating in the production, confirmation, and contestation of gender roles and gender relations. The course is based on the acknowledgment of many differences in the politics and traditions of particular countries and its objective is to analyze similarities and dissimilarities (in relation to women and art) within the region along both special and temporal axes. Requirements: Attendance is compulsory. The seminars will be organized around students’ presentations of assigned topics and readings. The classes are intended to foster lively discussion. Students who want to get credits for a seminar will need to write an essay on a topic around the course theme. 

Selected bibliography:
• Gender Check. Femininity and Masculinity in the Art of Eastern Europe, ex. cat., Bojana Pejic ed.,
Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, Cologne, 2009;
• Gender Check: a Reader, ed. Bojana Pejić, ERSTE Foundation and MUMOK, Wien Cologne,
2010;
• Performance Art in the Second Public Sphere, Katalin Cseh-Varga and Adam Czirak (eds), Routledge, 2018;
• Gender and War in Twentieth-century Eastern Europe, Nancy M. Wingfield, Maria Bucur-Deckard
(eds.), Indiana University Press, 2006;
• Socialist Spaces: Sites of Everyday Life in the Eastern Bloc, Susan E. Reid, David Crowley (eds.),
Oxford: Berg, 2002;
• Amy Bryzgel, Performance art in Eastern Europe since 1960, Manchester University Press, 2017;
• Maja Fowkes, The Green Bloc: Neo-Avant-Garde Art and Ecology Under Socialism, Budapest:
Central European University Press, 2015;
• Body and the East. From the 1960s to the Present, Zdenka Badovinac ed., The MIT Press 1999;
• Cold War Modern, David Crowley and Jane Pavitt (eds), London: V&A Publications, 2008

Europe’s LGBTQ Histories, Cultures and Politics: A Comparative Global Perspective
prof. UAM dr hab. Paweł Leszkowicz
II semester, 30 godz.
6 pkt. ECTS
Forma zaliczenia: zaliczenie z notą This course aims at comparative and transnational approach to LGBTQ histories, cultures, politics and rights in Europe. We will examine the late modern and contemporary European histories of sexuality and love, concentrating on questions of queer identities, freedom of expression, the cultural representations of desire and love, marriage equality, censorship and homophobic repression, and the intersection of culture and the politics of emancipation. This European story will be related to parallel global developments in 20th and 21st century. The historical cultural focus will be on visual arts, film, media, theatre, pop culture and sexual politics since the 1960s, paying attention to the contemporary situation in the EU and broader Europe in 2020. Research into and discussions about particular national cases in Europe and globally will be determined by the nationality of students participating in the course. The interdisciplinary nature of the seminar makes it open and relevant to students from such disciplines as European Studies; Global Studies; History; Art History, Cinema and Theater Studies, Gender Studies and Law. Requirements. Seminar attendance and the reading of assigned texts are compulsory. Seminars will be organized around discussion about reading from the syllabus and around individual students’ presentations of selected topics. On a rotating basis, each student will give a couple of brief presentations that should include visual material and the obligatory readings. The classes are intended to foster lively discussion, dialogic exchange and mutual learning. Toward the end of the semester each student will deliver a  longer talk on their research for the final paper. Erasmus students who want to get credits for a seminar will need to write an essay, and the Polish students who want to get credits for a facultative course will have to prepare in class presentations. Therefore the ability to critically understand and summarize academic and journalistic texts is necessary, as well as the skills of in class presentations and academic writing. The general knowledge of European history and current politics would be appreciated.

Bibliography

• Beger, Nico J., Tensions in the Struggle for Sexual Minority Rights in Europe. Que(e)rying Political
Practices. Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2004.
• Blake, Nayland, Lawrence Rinder and Amy Scholder. eds. In a Different Light. Visual Culture,
Sexual Identity, Queer Practic.e San Francisco: University Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive,
University of California at Berkeley, City Lights Books, 1995.
• Cook, Mark & Evans, J.V., eds. Queer Cities, Queer Cultures: Europe since 1945. London:
Bloomsbury, 2014.
• Dyer, Richard. Now You See It. Studies on Lesbian and Gay Film. New York, London: Routledge,
1990.
• Faderman, Lilliana. The Gay Revolution. The Story of the Struggle. New York, London, Toronto,
Sydney: Simon & Schuster, 2015.
• Getsy, David J. ed. Queer Art. Documents of Contemporary Art. London: Whitechapel Gallery, The
MIT Press, 2016.
• Griffiths, Robin and Mark, eds. Queer Cinema in Europe. Bristol, Chicago: Intellect, 2008.
• Healey, Dan. Russian Homophobia from Stalin to Sochi. London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017.
• Horne, Peter and Lewis Reina, eds. Outlooks. Lesbian and Gay Sexualities and Visual Cultures.
London, New York: Routledge,1996.
• Duberman, Martin, ed. Hidden From History: Reclaiming the Gay and Lesbian Past. New York:
Penguin, 1989.
• Kitliński, Tomasz. Dream? Democracy! A Philosophy of Horror, Hope & Hospitality in Art & Action.
Lublin: Maria Curie-Skłodowska University Press 2014.
• Leszkowicz, Pawel. Ars Homo Erotica (exhibition catalogue). Warsaw: The National Museum of
Art, CePed, 2010.
• Lord, Catherine and Meyer Richard, eds. Art & Queer Culture. London, New York: Phaidon 2013.
• Miller, Neil. Out of the Past. Gay and Lesbian History from 1869 to the Present. London, New York:
Vintage, 1995.
• Nussbaum, Martha C. Sex and Social Justice. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000
• Nussbaum, Martha C. From Disgust to Humanity. Sexual Orientation and Constitutional Law.
Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000.
• Russo, Vito. The Celluloid Closet. Homosexuality in the Movies. New York: Harper&Row, 1985.
• Rosello, Mireille, ed. What’s Queer about Europe? Productive Encounters and Re-enchanting
Paradigms. Fordham University Press, 2014.
• Tin, Louis-Georges. ed. The Dictionary of Homophobia: A Global History of Gay & Lesbian
Experience. Vancouver: Arsenal Pulp Press, 2008

Art in Post-communist Europe
dr Magdalena Radomska
II semestr, 30 godz.
6 pkt. ECTS
Forma zaliczenia: zaliczenia z notą The course will be focused on the artistic response to crucial political events in Postcommunist Europe from 1989 until the present day. Both foreign students with diverse backgrounds and Polish students of art history are welcome to join the course and discussion. The aim of the course is to equip students both with the historical and art historical knowledge and the theoretical framework build with critical texts discussing problems in question. Starting with main entries to post-communism and the artists’ reaction to the Fall of the Berlin Wall, following classes will problematize art in transition, 1990s and its narratives (War in the former Yugoslavia, critical art in Poland, technological progress, performance art in Russia, etc.), artistic responses to nationalism(s), post-communist art and art with marxist background, art and criticism of capitalism and problem of art workers and labour, It will also discuss the problem of new changing geography and geopolitics – new borders and new maps, main institutions of contemporary art in C-E Europe and most essential curatorial gestures and exhibitions in the region. The course will provide students with both the knowledge of oeuvres of most important artists and artistic groups of the region and of its art history – key art historians and thinkers on art after 1989. It will be enriched by the Skype meetings with both art historians and artists crucial for the topics. I do welcome students with various cultural and educational backgrounds. The course will have a format of a seminar with the crucial role of discussion and short presentations (if chosen by students). The final evaluation will take form of an essay on the chosen subject.

READING LIST
• András, E. (ed.), Video Art from Central and Eastern Europe 1989-2008, Budapest 2009.
• Astahovska, I. (ed.), Nineties. Contemporary Art in Latvia, Riga 2010.
• Bartošová, Z. (ed.), Contemporary Slovak Fine Art. 1960-2000. From the First Slovak Investnemt
Group’s Collection, Bratislava 2000.
• Bosteels, B. The Actuality of Communism, London-New York 2011.
• Eliot, D., Pejić, B., After the Wall: Art and culture in post-communist Europe, Stokholm 1999.
• Groys, B., Art Power, Cambridge, MA 2008.
• Groys,B., Communist Postcript, London 2010.
• Gržinić, M., Retroavangarde, Wien, 1997.
• Milovac, T. The Misfits. Conceptualist Strategies in Croatian Contemporary Art, Zagreb 2002.
• Milovac, T., Stipančić, B. (ed.), The Baltic Times. Contemporary Art from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania,
Zagreb 2001.
• Pejić, B. (ed.), Gender Check. Femininity and Masculinity in the Art of Eastern Europe, Wien/Cologne
2011.
• Piotrowski, P., Art and Democracy in Post-Communist Europe, London 2012.
• Piotrowski Piotr, In the Shadow of Yalta Art and the Avant-garde in Eastern Europe 1945-1989, London
2009.
• Sturcz, J., The Deconstruction of the Heroic Ego: The Artist’s Body as Metaphor in Hungarian Art
from the Mid-80’s to the Present, Budapest 1999
• Šuvaković, M., Impossible Histories: Historic Avant-Gardes, Neo-Avant-Gardes and Post-Avant
Gardes in Yugoslavia, 1918-1991, Cambridge 2003.
• Trossek, A. (ed.), Liina Siib. A Woman Takes a Little Space, 54th International Art Exhibition – La
Biennale di Venezia, Tallin 2011.
• Vild B. (et al.), On Normality. Art in Serbia 1989-2001, Belgrade 2001.